150803 EO featured photo

Tutorial: The Emily Ocker Cast On

It’s been ages since the last tutorial, hasn’t it? Time to fix that. With a new centre-out design coming out in the fall and the release of a revised version of the Sweet Lullaby Seamless Hooded Baby Blanket, now’s a good time to demonstrate a useful cast on for projects worked from the centre: the Emily Ocker cast on. This is the cast on that I go to for centre-out work, as I find it fairly easy to do, and a simple tug on the tail closes the hole left in the middle of your work.

120816 peephole featured photo

Mawata Colossus: the Peephole block

Being part 3 of a series of tutorials for the Mawata Colossus project. The first part explains how to knit with mawata or silk hankies, and the second gives a recipe for the Picture Window block. Because mawata don’t come in a standard yarn weight and you may have your own preferences for the gauge and size of your blocks, these posts describe how I make the blocks and give guidelines on making your own. They’re more sort of recipes, rather than proper tested, tech edited patterns.

120721 4th sts picked up

Mawata Colossus: the Picture Window block

Being part 2 of a series of tutorials for the Mawata Colossus project. Here is the first part, on how to knit with mawata. Because mawata don’t come in a standard yarn weight and you may have your own preferences for the weight and size of your blocks, these instructions are more guidelines than proper tested, tech edited patterns. 

120712 featured photo birds nest

Mawata Quilt Blocks: How do I knit with these things?

Since the Mawata Colossus post, a lot of people have asked me how it all works: how to knit with mawata, and how to make quilt-ish blocks from them. Since it’s a pretty loosey-goosey process, this series of posts will describe how I make the blocks, more as basic formulas than real, gauge-specific, tested and edited patterns.

Different leaf tips. Right: decreases following the line; left: decreases against the line.

Tutorial: Stick a leaf on it

So my car knitting shawl/scarf thingy is coming along nicely, and I was thinking about how useful the embossed leaf motif is. It’s easy: a series of increases at the bottom, some straight rows if you wish, and a series of decreases at the top. It’s adaptable: you can change the appearance, shape, and size by changing the type and placement of your increases and decreases. It’s self-contained: an embossed leaf grows and shrinks independently of the rest of the piece, so that you can keep doing whatever you were doing for the rest of the stitches, and at the…