Tutorial: Judy’s Magic Cast On

This is my usual cast on for toe up socks and slippers. I came across it years ago in Wendy D. Johnson’s book Toe Up Socks for Every Body, and it worked well for me, so I’ve stuck with it. I’m not going to tell you it’s the Best Cast On Ever, or even that it’s better or worse than any other toe up cast on out there, just that it works well for me and I kind of like the flippy motions of slinging the yarn around the needles like a very minimalist Cat’s Cradle. It’s the cast on…

Tubular Cast On: my current favourite method

I do adore the tubular cast on. It’s tidy, and stretchy, and in fine gauge yarns before some ribbing it looks positively professional. It’s particularly helpful when you want to get a stretchy rib from a yarn without much memory of its own, which is why it’s the key to a good brim in Slouch 1, 2, and 3. (The Slouches Collection samples, along with Line and Shadow, Tempered, and a new design coming out next week, are on their way to The Yarnery in Saint Paul, Minnesota for a trunk show. If you’re in the area, stop by their shop…

German Short Rows and how to do them

I do like an illustrated tutorial. I like the simplicity of the pictures, I like their imperfect hand-drawnness, and as it turns out, I rather enjoy making them. I’ve done a couple of tutorials for my new accessory collection*, and now that they’ve been editor-approved, I thought I’d share them here. Today: How to do German Short Rows.

Tutorial: The Emily Ocker Cast On

It’s been ages since the last tutorial, hasn’t it? Time to fix that. With a new centre-out design coming out in the fall and the release of a revised version of the Sweet Lullaby Seamless Hooded Baby Blanket, now’s a good time to demonstrate a useful cast on for projects worked from the centre: the Emily Ocker cast on. This is the cast on that I go to for centre-out work, as I find it fairly easy to do, and a simple tug on the tail closes the hole left in the middle of your work.

Mawata Colossus: the Peephole block

Being part 3 of a series of tutorials for the Mawata Colossus project. The first part explains how to knit with mawata or silk hankies, and the second gives a recipe for the Picture Window block. Because mawata don’t come in a standard yarn weight and you may have your own preferences for the gauge and size of your blocks, these posts describe how I make the blocks and give guidelines on making your own. They’re more sort of recipes, rather than proper tested, tech edited patterns.

Mawata Colossus: the Picture Window block

Being part 2 of a series of tutorials for the Mawata Colossus project. Here is the first part, on how to knit with mawata. Because mawata don’t come in a standard yarn weight and you may have your own preferences for the weight and size of your blocks, these instructions are more guidelines than proper tested, tech edited patterns. 

Mawata Quilt Blocks: How do I knit with these things?

Since the Mawata Colossus post, a lot of people have asked me how it all works: how to knit with mawata, and how to make quilt-ish blocks from them. Since it’s a pretty loosey-goosey process, this series of posts will describe how I make the blocks, more as basic formulas than real, gauge-specific, tested and edited patterns.